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• Celtic Weddings And drink and fight, Yes, we drink Irish Songs, Music, Lyrics and Midis for Traditional, Drinking and Folk Songs. On March 30th, 1967, The Dubliners released their version of "Seven Drunken Nights" as a single (this, kids, was a small vinyl record played at 45 RPM) - reaching number 1 in the Irish charts, and number 7 in the UK, leading to the "Top of the Pops" appearance of the hirsute Irishmen. Irish Song Lyrics: Sing Along to 10 of Our All-Time Favorite Irish Songs! Few drinking cultures are as storied as Irish drinking culture. Who owns that horse outside the door where my old horse should be? Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more And told the boys my story and we had another round, Now we drink PO Box 4396, Atlanta, Georgia 30033, ph 512.470.4866. Who owns that head upon the bed where my old head should be, Ah, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me I'll sleep with her tonight, And Mary McGregor well, she was a pretty whore I'll stumble back to Kelly's pub and cry away me pain. That is because some of the lyrics to "Seven Drunken Nights" are so risque (think: a hairy tin whistle "in her thing") that they were not allowed on television in 1967 when this bawdy ballad stormed the charts. 27 Best Ever Songs From Movie Soundtracks, NEW SONG: AC/DC - "Shot In The Dark" - LYRICS, HOT SONG: 21 Savage x Metro Boomin - "My Dawg​" - LYRICS. But a saddle on a sow sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw two hands upon her breasts where my old hands should be Last.fm Music | Copyright © 2020 CBS Interactive Inc. / All rights reserved. • Home • Celtic Magazine • Weddings Here is how to sing along: As I went home on Monday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw a horse outside the door where my old horse should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns that horse outside the door where my old horse should be? That was just the tax man that the Queen she sent to me. • Celtic CD Store • Celtic CDs I saw a horse outside the door where my old horse should be The fast-paced and funny song "Seven Drunken Nights" is one of the best known Irish folk songs both inside and outside of the Emerald Isle. • Patrons And drink and drink Ah, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, My wife said, "I have had enough, that's it I'm sick, get out" But an Englishman who can last till three I've never seen before, Background: Well, the jury is well and truly out on that one ... a version of this song, titled "The Merry Cuckold and the Kind Wife", was printed in a London broadside around 1760, and another version was recorded (as in "written down", there were no smartphones with recording function at that time) in Scotland about ten years later. Plus, I'll send you a free CD (you just pay the shipping). Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more But buttons in a blanket sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could be This romping song tells the story of an ill-fated ship named the Irish Rover. So drunk you can not see They're two lovely Geranium pots me mother sent to me Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a lovely sow that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut a saddle on a sow sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw a coat behind the door where my old coat should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns that coat behind the door where my old coat should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a woollen blanket that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut buttons in a blanket sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw a pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns that pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Thursday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw two boots beneath the bed where my old boots should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns them boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThey're two lovely Geranium pots me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut laces in Geranium pots I never saw before, And as I went home on Friday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw a head upon the bed where my old head should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns that head upon the bed where my old head should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a baby boy that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Saturday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw two hands upon her breasts where my old hands should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns them hands upon your breasts where my old hands should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a lovely night gown that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut fingers in a night gown sure I never saw before, As I went home on Sunday night as drunk as drunk could beI saw a thing in her thing where my old thing should beWell, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to meWho owns that thing in your thing where my old thing should be, Ah, you're drunk,you're drunk you silly old fool,still you can not seeThat's a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to meWell, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or moreBut hair on a tin whistle sure I never saw before. As I went home on Monday night as drunk as drunk could be It is best to learn the words because the audience is expected to sing along to this pub song. Learned from The Dubliners. Then there's podcasts, videos, and stories. From: The Holy Grail of Irish Drinking Songs. That's a baby boy that me mother sent to me But tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Thursday night as drunk as drunk could be And drink and drink And drink and drink That's a lovely sow that me mother sent to me But because he is drunk, she is able to turn the tables on him and has an answer to deny every sign of her infidelity. Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me Who was that lad sneaking out the back a quarter after three? Lyrics to 'Irish Drinking Song' by Flogging Molly: Well I stumbled in at 2 am all drunk and full of smoke My wife said, 'I have had enough, that's it I'm sick, get out' So I stumbled down to Kelly's pub across the edge of town And told the boys my story and we had another round • Links. That's a lovely night gown that me mother sent to me Who owns that coat behind the door where my old coat should be, Ah, you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool, But on the day she died all the men in town did weep Luckily, there are no censors at the pub - which is where you will usually hear this song played live. But laces in Geranium pots I never saw before, And as I went home on Friday night as drunk as drunk could be I saw a coat behind the door where my old coat should be The fast-paced and funny song "Seven Drunken Nights" is one of the best known Irish folk songs both inside and outside of the Emerald Isle. I lad sneaking out the back, a quarter after three. LiveAbout uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me It is the song that the beloved Irish folk group The Dubliners performed during their first appearance on "Top of the Pops" in the 1960s (they later appeared again with The Pogues, belting out "The Irish Rover"). • Celtic Travel words and music traditional . And drink and drink • Become a Patron! But a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before, And as I went home on Saturday night as drunk as drunk could be But even though the song was massively popular, the band was not allowed to perform all of the verses.

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